Initial Thoughts

Woolls Reading
The elementary librarian seems so organized and put together. Glad I’ve had practicum experience, it helps to better visualize what is going on and how.
I was surprised how different the elementary school and high school work
seemed to be. In the elementary school, the librarian seemed very involved with the teachers and students, and in helping to teach students. Where at the iCenter at the high school, the librarian seemed less of instructor/teacher and more of a manager, dealing mostly with technology, staffing and management of students and classes. I’m curious if this is a common trend, or if it is more dependent on the school and its resources.

Stephen Reading
I’m excited about this idea of where the school is heading, particularly with individual meet-ups and conferences with students to help them explore their interests. I know I want to work alongside teachers and students, and that is why I am so drawn to school librarianship.

I’m not sure I completely buy-in that public education will give way to online learning and privatized education, but I think there is a need for us to transform what public education is, should be, and should look like. Overall, I loved this piece and found it spoke to almost everything I have been piecing together, contemplating about and how I want to approach managing a school library.

Pappas Reading
I found this to be a great overview of past reform in a nice linear way. While I have had the chance to discuss education reform in the U.S. in a previous class, I wish I had read this article to help understand the baseline of some current day practices. I found what school library media specialist could do to help support students and faculty to be nothing new or shocking. I believe it is my job to be a collaborator with students, faculty and administrators. I am curious though since this was written in 2007 what the impact of the CCSS has had.

The Big Idea
What I can take away from these first three readings is the importance of having pride and belief in the work of a school library media specialist. By having pride in what we do, we can better carve and advocate our role in schools. Also, the importance of collecting data and continually learning and sharing with one another so we are able to further advocate for school libraries, along with staying up to date. Lastly, reading these articles and being apart of these conversations just re-affirms why I want to be a media specialist and the the role and impact I hope to play in the education system.

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2 thoughts on “Initial Thoughts

  1. kristinfont says:

    “In the elementary school, the librarian seemed very involved with the teachers and students, and in helping to teach students. Where at the iCenter at the high school, the librarian seemed less of instructor/teacher and more of a manager, dealing mostly with technology, staffing and management of students and classes. I’m curious if this is a common trend, or if it is more dependent on the school and its resources.”

    My take? What you saw in Woolls is pretty much what we see in practice. That’s why it’s hard that library media is a K-12 endorsement: they’re totally different jobs!

  2. nicolesa602 says:

    “I’m not sure I completely buy-in that public education will give way to online learning”

    Me either, and I definitely hope that it wouldn’t. I love the idea of having online learning as an option, and it definitely has its perks in certain situations (I even introduced my grandfather to MOOCS, which he’ll try as soon as he stops getting into fights with Gmail), but a huge part of what I learned in K-12 was how to interact with classmates. Small group work where you actually got to argue out ideas and talk to each other were some of the most rewarding educational moments. A lot would be lost if you took out this chance for face-to-face learning, where you’re figuring things out with the person next to you.

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