Schedules

Fixed or flexed? Who knew Gantt charts would come back to haunt us from 501?

I think the question about fixed or flexed schedule is interesting. On one hand, I have often seen fixed schedules for elementary students. I myself in elementary had a weekly library lesson from K-5. Mrs. Delancey was able to form a relationship with us all, and that day of the week was always a highlight (so were music and art days). I think fixed scheduling is great, especially for elementary ages. I loved the Hribar article where she discusses using inquiry based learning on a fixed schedule. As a very young, and fairly inexperienced person in the profession, I not only found her article relatable, and comforting, but also thought fixed scheduling might be a nice way to start your career. With trying to plan, run a library  advisory board committee, and buzz around, at least you’d have one thing fairly consistent.

However, I’m not sure if fixed scheduling is the right choice for all grades, and all schools. Is it necessary for middle and high school students to have instruction once a week? Or are there needs more satisfied if we allow a structure that lets them come in and use the library? In the Woolls, Weeks, and Coatney book they talked about creating policies and rules. So if you wanted the library to be available to students not in study hall, you should make up rules for them to follow on the use of the library.

This for some reason sparked a connection with a book I’m reading on the side about the difference in American and French parenting. In France they believe in a strict “cadre”, frame, that are the foundational rules for their children. Within this frame, they give a lot of freedom. In France, it is about balancing the family, teaching a child how to be apart of the rhythm of that family. As I was thinking about libraries, classrooms, students… I soon realized that this same idea would be possible to use in schools, especially in a library. Having foundational rules implemented, and then allow freedom in the library to what and how they want to work, along with demonstrating the rhythm of the classroom/library.

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One thought on “Schedules

  1. nicolesa602 says:

    “I soon realized that this same idea would be possible to use in schools, especially in a library. Having foundational rules implemented, and then allow freedom in the library to what and how they want to work, along with demonstrating the rhythm of the classroom/library.”

    I really like this. It’s amazing what a little freedom can do for a student. When I felt that a teacher trusted me enough to know what I wanted to do and how to go about doing it, I was more engaged and felt more capable–I wasn’t just going through the motions. The foundational rules, however, keep you on track and keep you from freezing up, fearful that you’re overstepping bounds, or doing something wrong without knowing it.

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